Around Rittenhouse Square

Walking Friendly

30 minutes Round Trip

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Some of Philadelphia’s most beloved outdoor sculptures were realized through the support of civic-minded Philadelphians. A selection of these artworks can be viewed in Rittenhouse Square, one of the five original squares planned by William Penn in the 1600’s.

Evelyn Taylor Price Memorial Sundial

(1947)

by Beatrice Fenton (1887 - 1983)

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

Commissioned by the Rittenhouse Square Improvement Association in memory of Evelyn Taylor, who was the organization’s president as well as the long-term president of the Flower Market Association.

Giant Frog

(1941)

by Cornelia Van Auken Chapin (1893 - 1972)

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

A large frog sits at rest in Rittenhouse Square, apparently in concentration.

Dr. J. William White Memorial

(1922)

by Paul Phillippe Cret (1876 - 1945), R. Tait McKenzie (1867 - 1938)

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

In memory of Dr. J. William White, founding member of the Rittenhouse Square Improvement Association.

Duck Girl

(1911)

by Paul Manship (1885 – 1966)

Rittenhouse Square, Children's Pool, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

Poised in a Greek dress, the figure draws on classical imagery – characteristic of Paul Manship’s earlier works.

Lion Crushing a Serpent

(1832, cast 1891)

by Antoine-Louis Barye (1796 - 1875)

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

Barye’s bronze symbolizes the lion of monarchy crushing the evil serpent and is the first sculpture installed in Rittenhouse Square.

Gardener’s Cottage Gates

(2010)

by Eric Berg (1945 - )

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

One of the Rittenhouse Square’s newer works, “Gardener’s Cottage Gates” was commissioned by the Friends of Rittenhouse Square as a memorial to longtime board member and resident Patty Hogan.

Billy

(1914)

by Albert Laessle (1877 - 1954)

Rittenhouse Square, Walnut Street between 18th and 19th Streets

Inspired by and rendered after a family goat, this sculpture was one of several animals that Albert Laessle created.

Greyhound Sculptures

(1988)

by Artist Unknown

Rittenhouse Square, SW entrance

Located at the southwest entrance of Rittenhouse Square, these two stone Greyhound sculptures were donated and installed in 1988 by friends of the late art collector and curator Henry P. McIlhenny.