Shakespeare Memorial (1926)

by Alexander Stirling Calder (1870 - 1945)

Photo Caption: Photo Caitlin Martin © 2010 for the Association for Public Art
Logan Square, Benjamin Franklin Parkway between 19th and 20th Streets
1926

  • Title

    Shakespeare Memorial

  • Artist

    Alexander Stirling Calder (1870 - 1945)

  • Year

    1926; installed 1928; relocated 1953

  • Medium

    Bronze, on black marble base

  • Dimensions

    Height 6′ (base 14’2″)

  • Themes

    The Calder Family (of Artists)

Commissioned by the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art), City of Philadelphia, and the Shakespeare Memorial Committee

Owned by the City of Philadelphia


Museum Without Walls Audio

0:00/ 0:00

Download Museum Without Walls audio file

At A Glance

  • Part of the Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO program

  • Alexander Stirling Calder’s monument to Shakespeare representing Comedy and Tragedy

  • The memorial was relocated in 1953 to its present location because of the expressway construction

John Sartain approached the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art) in 1892 with an interest in raising funds for a monument to Shakespeare through public and private subscription. By 1917 funds were in place, and Alexander Stirling Calder was commissioned.

The well-known quote from As You Like It is inscribed on the base: “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”

The original site in front of the Free Library was carefully selected by representatives from both the Art Association and the Shakespeare Memorial Committee, with additional input from architects Gilbert McIlvaine, Paul Cret, and Jacques Gréber. The sculpture was cast in 1926 by the Roman Bronze Works and dedicated on Shakespeare’s birthday in 1929. Because of expressway construction, the memorial was moved in 1953 to its present location.

Shakespeare Memorial by Alexander Stirling Calder
Photo Caitlin Martin © 2010 for the Association for Public Art

The sculpture depicts two figures, representing Comedy and Tragedy. Hamlet is shown leaning his head against a knife, while Touchstone, the jester, sits at his feet, his head rolled back in laughter. The well-known quote from As You Like It is inscribed on the base: “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”

Adapted from Public Art in Philadelphia by Penny Balkin Bach (Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 1992).

Museum Without Walls logo: a program of the Association for Public Art

 

Voices heard in the program:

Phillip H. Wagner is Dean of the Shakspere Society of Philadelphia, established in 1852.

Sarah Garonzik is the former Executive Producing Director of The Philadelphia Theatre Company.

Damon Bonetti is an actor who performs for the Philadelphia Shakespeare Festival.

Segment Producer: Kara Oehler

A program of the Association for Public Art (formerly the Fairmount Park Art Association), Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO is an innovative and accessible outdoor sculpture audio program for Philadelphia’s preeminent collection of public art.

User calls Museum Without Walls Audio for Robert Indiana's LOVE sculpture
Photo Albert Yee © 2010 for the Association for Public Art

A “multi-platform” interactive audio experience – available for free by cell phone, mobile app, audio download, or on the web – Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO offers the unique histories that are not typically expressed on outdoor permanent signage.

Unlike audio tours that have a single authoritative guide or narrator, each speaker featured in Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO is an “authentic voice” – someone who is connected to the sculpture by knowledge, experience, or affiliation. Over 150 unique voices are featured, including artists, educators, scientists, writers, curators, civic leaders, and historians.

This artwork is part of the Along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway tour

Loading map...

More artworks

Need More Information?

General Inquiries

info@associationforpublicart.org or call 215.546.7550