Programs

Whether they’re imitating, appreciating, or simply looking cute, we want to see your #ArtPup with sculptures around Philadelphia. Enter for a chance to win!

A month-long series of photography workshops led by Philadelphia-based photographers for participants of all levels. See the city’s sculpture through a new lens!

In August 2015, public art came to life in Rittenhouse Square! Visitors participated in live animal sculpture-making workshops led by teaching artists and observed Philadelphia artists conducting sculpture demonstrations.

In fall 2014, the Association for Public Art (aPA) in collaboration with the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rodin Museum presented #THINKpublicart: a photo contest and crowdsourcing social media project that used YOUR photo submissions.

In winter 2013, the Association for Public Art (aPA) presented #LOVEpublicart: a photo contest and crowdsourcing social media project that used YOUR photo submissions. Participants were asked to submit their best pics of Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture via our Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using #LOVEpublicart.

“Site Seeing: Rediscover Public Art this Spring!” was a month-long celebration of public art that invited Philadelphians and visitors to rediscover the city’s outdoor sculpture. A series of four free programs engaged city residents and tourists with public art in new and unexpected ways.

A series of Saturdays during fall 2010 and 2011 that offered free hands-on family programming, including artist-led sculpture workshops for kids, self-guided sculpture iPod tours, live music and more.

New•Land•Marks was a program of Association for Public Art that brought together artists and community organizations to plan and create new works throughout Philadelphia. Sixteen proposals – five of which were commissioned – incorporated public art into ongoing community development, urban greening, public amenities, and other revitalization initiatives.

To bridge the gap between public art and ordinary life, the Association for Public Art initiated the pioneering program “Form and Function,” which invited artists to propose public art projects for Philadelphia that would be utilitarian, site-specific, and integral to community life—works that would be integrated into the public context through use as well as placement.