Tamanend (1994)

by Raymond Sandoval (1958 - )

Photo Caption: Photo Alec Rogers © 2016 for the Association for Public Art
  • Title

    Tamanend

  • Artist

    Raymond Sandoval (1958 - )

  • Year

    1994; installed 1995

  • Location

    Historic East Market Street, Front and Market Streets

  • Medium

    Bronze, on Wissahickon schist

  • Dimensions

    Height 21′ (base 16′)

  • Themes

    Native American Themes

Commissioned by the City of Philadelphia, Department of Streets, and Historic East Market Street, Inc.

Owned by the City of Philadelphia

At A Glance

  • Chief Tamanend stands atop a turtle while an eagle with a wampum belt in its grasp is perched on his shoulder

  • The turtle symbolized Mother Earth and the eagle represented a messenger of the Great Spirit

  • The site-specific sculpture faces Alexander Milne Calder’s William Penn atop City Hall

Chief Tamanend, with a welcoming outstretched arm, stands atop a turtle while an eagle with a wampum belt in its grasp is perched on his shoulder. To the Lenni-Lenape tribe, who welcomed William Penn upon his arrival to Pennsylvania in 1682, the turtle symbolized Mother Earth and the eagle represented a messenger of the Great Spirit. Tamanend was the leader of the Lenni-Lanape tribe, and the belt held in the eagle’s talons signifies a friendship treaty agreed upon between Penn, Tamanend, and other Native Americans.

Revered by many as a symbol of peace, Tamanend was named a “Patron Saint of America,” and May 1st was considered “Tamanend Day.”

Artist Raymond Sandoval’s site-specific sculpture is installed at Front and Market Streets, facing Alexander Milne Calder’s William Penn atop City Hall. Standing more than 20 feet tall and weighing nearly 4 tons, Tamanend was unveiled in June 1995.

Tamanend
Photo Alec Rogers © 2016 for the Association for Public Art

 

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