Silenus and the Infant Bacchus (4th century B.C., cast 1885)

by Praxiteles c. 400-330 B.C.

Photo Caption: Photo Alec Rogers © 2014 for the Association for Public Art
  • Title

    Silenus and the Infant Bacchus

  • Artist

    Praxiteles c. 400-330 B.C.

  • Year

    4th Century B.C., cast 1885

  • Location

    Kelly Drive, between Sedgley Drive and Fairmount Avenue

  • Medium

    Bronze, on granite base

  • Dimensions

    Height 6'1", width 2'8", depth 2'7" (base height 4'3", width 4'3", depth 4'2 1/2")

Purchased by the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art)

Owned by the City of Philadelphia

At A Glance

  • Considered one of the masterpieces of antiquity and originally carved in marble

  • Praxiteles was a renowned ancient Greek Attic sculptor

  • This bronze reproduction was cast from the original in the Louvre in Paris

Considered one of the masterpieces of antiquity, this sculptural group was originally carved in marble by Praxiteles, a renowned ancient Greek Attic sculptor. In Greek mythology Silenus is known as the chief of the satyrs’, a troop of male companions of Pan and Dionysus who roamed the woods and mountains. He is holding his foster son, Bacchus, the god of wine, who is crowned with grape leaves.

This bronze reproduction, purchased by the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art) in 1885, was cast from the original in the Louvre by the Barbedienne Foundry in Paris.

Silenus and the Infant Bacchus
Photo Alec Rogers © 2014 for the Association for Public Art

RESOURCES

This artwork is part of the Along Kelly Drive tour

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